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How Often Do I Change My Water Filter?

One of the most common questions we hear from our customers is in regards to how frequently a water filter cartridge should be changed. Whether it’s a standard sediment or carbon filter, every customer has one key priority in mind: How Long Will I Have Dependably Clean, Great Tasting Water? In other words, how can I be sure that my filter is still reducing the impurities that can impact the flavor of my water? Our standard answer: It depends. The frequency of filter changes depends upon your water quality and your water usage. For example, if there are a lot of sediment particulates in your water, then you will have to change your filters more frequently than someone with little to no sediment. If you are a large restaurant consuming large amounts of water a minute or a hospital with large ice machines, then your usage will demand more frequent filter changes. Having said that, we suggest replacement schedules that are generally as follows: Everpure High Flow CRS Quad MC2 System The most common Everpure Filtration System, mainly seen in the back of the house of restaurants should be changed every 6 months, or every 36,000 gallons. The EC210 prefilter, to the left of the MC2 filters, should be changed more frequently to extend the life of the MC2 filters. We recommend every 3-4 months.       Insurice Triple PF i4000(2) System w/ 20″ Prefilter For water filtration on ice machines, sometimes it can be difficult knowing when to change the filters, especially if you see no difference in the ice. But even if the ice is fine, deep inside the machine inches of scale can be forming and ruining your machine. That’s why it is important to keep a filter change out schedule. We recommend every 6 months or however many gallons are specified on the water filters. For the system pictured to the left, the Insurice Triple PF i4000(2), change those filters every 36,000 gallons of use. Again, changing the prefilter will give your primary cartridges longer life. You should also replace your water filters whenever you notice a decline in performance, whether it is a drop in flow rate and/or pressure, or an unusual taste in the water. You should also, per the CDC, replace your water filter after any boil water advisory alert is lifted in your area. Remember: taste and odor may tip you off to the presence of chlorine in your water, but most contaminants are tasteless and odorless. For the benefit of our customers, we have set-up automatic electronic reminders that are sent when we see that their filters are due to be replaced, based on order history.  We can even set-up Auto-Ship for customers that know they will need water filters by a certain date, but may not remember to place an order. If you have a water filter or filter model not included in the list above, and have a question regarding how often you should replace your filter, I invite you to submit a question below or call our team at 1-800-942-7873. Click here to ask us a question!

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Lovin' Your Combi-Oven

Michael Engel, owner of Pastiche Bistro in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with his favorite piece of kitchen equipment, the Alto Shaam Mini Combi oven. Photo by Kevin J. Miyazaki/Redux
One of the functions of a Combi-oven is its steam feature. Steam equipment is very susceptible to scale and corrosion problems. The last thing you want is your combi-oven breaking down, leaving you scrambling to figure out how you’re going to prepare your food and then trying to find a technician to fix the combi-oven, and you KNOW how expensive that can be! So it’s time to show your combi-oven some LOVE! Take careful consideration of its water quality by understanding a few basic characteristics about your water: 

  • Chlorine/Chloramines
  • Hardness (scale)
  • Chlorides

Chlorine and Chloramines are disinfectants that protect us from water-borne disease and other health risks, but they also promote corrosion in cooking equipment. The scale forming compounds of calcium and magnesium carbonate are found in most water supplies. The physics of generating steam results in the precipitation of these dissolved minerals which forms hard scale in boilers, valves and fittings, and on elements, cabinet walls and glass. Chlorides are common, active ions of dissolved solids in water that can cause pitting and crevice corrosion. At high temperatures chlorides are particularly corrosive to stainless steel.  Chlorides can only be removed with a system that utilizes reverse osmosis.

With these facts in mind, you want to make sure you pick the right water filtration system for your combi-oven. Here are a few options:

(Click the image to see more information on these systems.)

To figure out what is in your water, call us today for a water test kit!